Cutting + sticking + sewing + baking. My creative life.

How to be a Craftivist in the Art of Gentle Protest

On Friday 20th July I went to a talk by Sarah Corbett of the Craftivist Collective at Ditchling Museum of Art and Craft entitled  How to be a Craftivist in the Art of Gentle Protest.  Ditchling Museum is a beautiful venue.

There was an exhibition of the work of Sister Corita Kent (1918-1986), a Roman Catholic nun, pop artist and activist who worked mainly with silkscreen printing.  Her artwork, with its messages of love and peace, was particularly popular during the social upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s.

 

In 2008, burned out from too much confrontation, slactivism and clicktivism, and doubting the effectiveness of many elements of conventional activism, Sarah starting looking for alternatives. When she discovered craftivism – a term coined by American writer and crafter Betsy Greer in 2003 – Sarah realised that craftivism could offer what she’d been looking for: something new to add to her activism toolkit.

With no projects or groups for her to join, she decided to have a go at creating her own craftivism projects. Soon Sarah had developed her own unique ‘Gentle Protest’ approach to craftivism, and had gained a following of friends and strangers around the world wo wanted to get involved. And so, in 2009, the Craftivist Collective was born.

I found Sarah’s talk inspiring, as an introvert, she has successfully  used Craftivism as part of her activism.  I was fortunate to meet her after the event and she signed my copy of How to be a Craftivist.

Graffiti on exchange box in Ditchling, one of my favourite words.
Here is a tart I had at The Bull in Ditchling because I was hungry.

I’ve been to some excellent talks this year and this event was a highlight.

Love Melanie Xx

One Response to “How to be a Craftivist in the Art of Gentle Protest”

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Thanks for sharing, enjoyed reading, so interesting. Great life. You were truly blessed Melanie!

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